Island Region #d1 Activities
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Hawai'i - The Big Island - Regional Zones:

Hawaii - Big Island Regional Zones Click on any Region on the Big Island for More Information

Kona Region:

Divided into two sub Regions known as “North Kona” and “South Kona”. This is the Region you probably landed in if you came to Hawai’i by airplane. It is located on the mid-western shore of the Island, and it is best known for incredibly great weather, clear mornings, calm, clear and warm water. The fishing, snorkeling and scuba here are “World Class”, as are the resorts and hospitality in the Kailua-Kona and Waikoloa areas.

Afternoon breezes often come in off the ocean, as large tracts of mountain lava desert generate rising radiant heat from the sun. This produces a cooling effect at the shore, and is a plus for wind surfing and boogie boarding. Breezes subside in the evenings, and the cycle repeats almost every day.

Kohala Region:

Divided into two sub Regions known as “North Kohala” and “South Kohala”. This Region hosts the birthplace of King Kamehameha I, and several important historical landmarks. The water here is arguably the clearest of anywhere in the Hawaiian Islands, with little to no ground water run-off from the Island streams. Great fishing, snorkeling and scuba are the hallmarks of this gorgeous Region.

Afternoon breezes often come in off the ocean, as large tracts of mountain lava desert generate rising radiant heat from the sun. This produces a cooling effect at the shore, and is a plus for wind surfing and boogie boarding. Breezes subside in the evenings, and the cycle repeats almost every day. Expect cooler weather and more rain as you head east in North Kohala. Populations are light in this part of the Island near the ocean.

Hamakua Region:

A large component of the celebrated “North Shore” of the Island of Hawai’i. This Region has mountainous cliffs adjacent to many beaches and access can be difficult, if not near impossible. On the beaches that are available directly by road, expect a traditional Hawaiian paradise of greenery and flora growing near the beaches. More rain frequents this side of Hawai’i. In fact, this large agricultural area was devoted to cultivating sugar cane, but now is largely used for other crops including flowers, vegetables, and cattle.

If your tour plans allow it, make a point to see the Hamakua Region by helicopter. The sheer magnificence of the steep sea cliffs will re-invigorate your wonder of creation, and the color of the Pacific Ocean here is something not to be missed.

Hilo Region:

Divided into two sub Regions known as “North Hilo” and “South Hilo”. North Hilo takes up right where the Hamakua Region leaves off. The sea cliffs slowly become less steep, and the beaches become more generally available and accessible. Many wonderful streams and waterfalls hallmark this Region. And the abundance of fresh water makes everything lush, green and continually growing.

Populations increase as you near the historic town of Hilo, Hawai’i. This is a classic “old Hawaiian” town, with traditions that celebrate the wonder and beauty of the land and people. Hilo’s heart is tied to the sea and the beaches, and the design of the town helps you enjoy the ocean more with respect.

Puna Region:

The most eastern Region of the Big Island of Hawaii. One Hawaiian term for a water spring is “Puna”, and this Region’s shoreline and beaches are fit for this name. Several tide pools in this area are available where you can experience the thrill of cool fresh spring water mingling with warmer sea water for a most invigorating and refreshing swimming adventure. Turtles love it too! Another component that adds interest to the beaches and shorelines of this Region is the fact that several active lava tubes interact with some of the tide pools, and not only can you enjoy cooler swimming – but warmer swimming and bathing as well. Some of natures’ biggest natural hot tubs exist on the shores of Puna, and nothing feels better than a warm sea water hot tub experience. Find it here, and tell your friends.

The Puna Region also is the home the Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. You can watch new beaches being made here, with new land and sand that is younger than you are.

Ka’u Region:

This was the original landing spot for both the Tahitians and previous to them, the Natives of the Marquesas Islands that came to colonize Hawai’i. It is not known what thoughts originally filled the minds of these early ocean voyagers, but the majesty and clarity of the beaches in this Region must have been a sight after such long sea voyages.

Even today, you can stand at the cliffs of South Point (the most Southern point in the United States) and see huge schools of fish and sea life teeming in crystal clear water. If you choose your beach carefully, you can fish, swim, snorkel, and scuba in water with 100 foot plus visibility. Sea and Tide currents can be an issue here, so consult a local expert for advice. But once you have experienced the majesty of the conditions in Ka’u you will want to frequent these beaches as often as you can.

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kau kona kona kona Kohala kohala hamakua hilo puna